CoMM C: Transitioning from a Straight Path to a Simple Bend

For old times' sake, some educational info for everyone who needs more control over his/her bike.

CoMM C: Transitioning from a Straight Path to a Simple Bend

Postby David W » 05 Oct 2018, 23:59

:oops: This is a place where we can start to talk about one of our Cornering techniques.

Suppose you are riding in balanced fashion down a straight path. At the end of that straight is a bend in the road, a bend that you are familiar with.

That bend is of the simple type in that it has both a definite inside and an outer side. It is more like a "C" curve than, for example, an "S" curve. You can even think of that curve as part of a circle, and assume that you plan to go round that circular path in balanced fashion at a fairly constant speed that you have chosen. (You can also assume, if you want, that your chosen speed is low enough so that you have no need to change your body posture, or your position in the saddle, while negotiating this corner.)

Describe, if you will, how you transition your bike from that straight path so that it ends up rounding that curve in balanced fashion.

Some words that might be useful to you in your description are contained in the nearby thread called CoMM B and C: The Terminology of Turning and Balancing on nearby page http://www.my-mc-phoenix.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=14780 .

A balancing technique that I plan to use in my description is contained in the nearby thread CoMM B: Doing Basic Bike Balancing using the "Minimal" Method. (Maybe you will find it useful in your description; see nearby page http://www.my-mc-phoenix.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=14829 for it.)

Finally, assume that the simple curve described ends by becoming another straight path. We can discuss at a later time how we transition from that curved path to that other, second straight path.
'Tis not its looks, but how it cooks.
And I've found that most liter size Pans, when warmed up, cook well.
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David W
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Re: CoMM C: Transitioning from a Straight Path to a Simple

Postby David W » 22 Mar 2020, 05:17

I will have a go at it.
I start by assuming all that is listed in the above post.

I have already slowed to my desired speed. I have chosen a path toward the outside of the curve but away from the outer edge of my lane. And I have checked that there is no other vehicle following me too closely.

In short, I first lean the bike toward the inside of the curve. Then I quickly steer towards that inside.

Here are the details:

First, when I get to the Right Place, I push the inner grip away from me a slight to moderate amount. This unbalances the bike towards the inside, causing the lean angle to start increasing more and more. (This step can be called Counter steering for inbalance, and it requires some traction in the front.)

Second, I monitor the increasing lean angle. If it's increasing at about the right rate, I just wait until the lean angle approaches that angle I estimate is Right for this speed and this curve.

Third, when the lean angle is almost Right, I rebalance the bike using the Minimal Method mentioned above. Doing so leaves the bike leaning into the curve and steadily steered towards the inside of the curve. And if the resulting, steady, lean angle is indeed Right, I am all set to cruise around the curve, in balanced fashion, at my chosen speed.
--------------------------------------------------------------Even More Details-------------------------------------------
In that last sentence, the lean angle is "steady" because the bike has been brought back into balance. And to end on a technical note, the "steady" steering mentioned means the "steering angle" is not changing, and so the path of the bike is a "circular" path, which matches the assumed shape of the road, and of my lane. I and the bike are indeed "all set" to cruise round the curve.

That "third" step can be called Counter steering for balance, followed by Direct steering (which is steering toward the inside of the curve). And because it tends to slow down the bike a bit, the third step often includes rolling on the throttle a bit, in order to keep the bike from leaning too much. The third step and even the subsequent "cruising" typically require substantial, continuous traction, front and rear.

Disclaimer:. This is all merely a personal description. It is not a recipe; it contains no recommendation and no guarantee, either.
'Tis not its looks, but how it cooks.
And I've found that most liter size Pans, when warmed up, cook well.
User avatar
David W
Bacon Butty Legend
Bacon Butty Legend
 
Posts: 1171
Joined: 30 Aug 2006, 04:50
Location: Topeka, Kansas, USA
Full name: David W.
Make: Honda
Model: ST1100M/P ST1100AR/S
Year: 1991/1993, 1994/1995
Colour: 2 reds; 2 are black.


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